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Leeds Trinity University::Research::Student profiles  

Student profiles

 
​Our current and previous Research Students cover a range of subject areas in their work.
 

​Below are some examples:


Joanna Adhikari 

Joanna Adhikari completed her undergraduate degree in Psychology and completed an MSc in Forensic Psychology, both at Sheffield Hallam University. Joanna’s Master’s dissertation was on the Perceptions of Stalkers. She is currently a PhD student working across two disciplines, both in the Department of Psychology and the Institute of Childhood and Education at Leeds Trinity University, where she is working on a research project entitled “The assessment of impulsivity and aggression and their contribution to risk in intimate partner violence”.

Joanna has also completed an Associate of Arts Degree in Liberal Studies and Psychology at Northern Kentucky University, USA. Her interests are Forensic psychology and Domestic violence and abuse, and how psychological factors might contribute to risk, in order to assist front line practitioners. Joanna has experience with multi method research designs, Questionnaires and SPSS, Qualtrics, NVivo, EPrime, interviewing skills for qualitative research, and thematic analysis.
 
Joanna is a graduate member of the British Psychological Society and has also spent some time being an Appropriate Adult, which involves providing additional support to vulnerable adults and children in police custody during their police interviews.


Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a PhD student who began his project in October 2014 at Leeds Trinity University after completing his Bachelor’s in History and his Master’s in Social History.  His PhD will focus upon 19th-century representations of Robin Hood. Stephen’s is working on a project enitiled: “Robin Hood: The Construction of a Respectable Outlaw Hero in the 18th and 19th Centuries”, which will give him the opportunity to merge many of his existing research interests into a single project, for Robin Hood appeared in every genre of print culture.

Stephen is primarily an historian of literature, particularly the popular literature of crime from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Of interest to him on a personal level is collecting 18th and 19th century ballad collections such as Thomas Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (1765), Joseph Ritson's Robin Hood (1795), and Robert Burns' The Merry Muses (1799).
 
 
Stephen has experience in management and public speaking, and has previously undertaken research into the history of crime, in particular the offences of outlawry and highway robbery and their representation in print culture, especially the works of William Harrison Ainsworth, Charles Dickens, and G.W.M. Reynolds.
 
 

Jo Clarke

Jo holds an MA in Sport, Culture and Community from Sheffield Hallam University and currently work as a Graduate Teaching Assistant at Leeds Trinity University, where she teaches a number of modules within the Department of Sport, Health & Nutrition alongside conducting her PhD research.

Jo’s background is within sports development and coaching and has worked in a variety of operational and strategic coaching and development roles in the UK, New Zealand and Africa. Jo’s previous role at Leeds Trinity University included managing the sports volunteer programme and Coach Education programme in addition to working as a Visiting lecturer. 

Prior to Leeds Trinity University, Jo worked for Badminton England to deliver the 2009 – 2013 Whole Sport Plan for Badminton across Yorkshire and North East where she worked closely with Yorkshire & North East Universities and other key delivery partners. 

Jo volunteers as the country manager for Cameroon for a UK based Sport for Development NGO, Cricket Without Boundaries, who use Cricket as a tool to deliver HIV/Aids awareness messages in partnership with national Cricket Associations and health NGOs in five countries within Sub-Saharan Africa; Botswana, Cameroon, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda.  
  

Teaching and Administration:   


Level 4
  • Coaching Process and Practice
  • Research Methods
Level 5
  • Event Management
  • Organising and Managing Sport
  • Research Methods
Level 6
  • Community Sports Development
  • Special Populations
  • Sport in Society     

Research:


Jo is completing her PhD which is titled: The power dynamics within sport voluntourism; perspectives from Cameroon. 
Synopsis of PhD: The last decade has witnessed a significant increase in the use of sport as a development tool within the global south. Despite an increasing breadth of study within this area to date, academic analysis has rarely considered the views of volunteers from the global north and scarcely views from volunteers in the global south, despite an ever increasing reliance on volunteers by international Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to deliver sport-for-development projects. The PhD aims to critically deconstruct power dynamics between actors from the global north and global south working in the sport-for-development sector, in order to establish how these dynamics foster opportunities for empowerment and the development of social capital for global south volunteers. Global north NGOs often propose outcomes of empowerment and personal gain for local communities they work with, therefore this study will adopt a mixed method approach in order to assess the opportunities for empowerment and social capital from the perspectives of global south actors.

PhD supervisors: Dr. Paul Salisbury (Leeds Trinity University, SHN) and Dr. Polly Wilding (University of Leeds, POLI​S).

 


Gary McKee

Gary McKee completed a BSSc in Human Geography and Politics in 1998, followed by a phD in Geography in 2002, both at Queen’s University Belfast, before  receiving a 1st class honours in his Theological Studies degree at the University of Glamorgan in 2006.  

Gary is currently a PhD student working in the department of Theology and Religion at Leeds Trinity University, where he is working on a research project entitled “Benjamin Bailey and the Church Missionary Society in the Ecclesiastical Development of Kerala.” Under the supervision of Professor Kirsteen Kim.

In addition to his research work, Gary has served as a Free Church minister, taught Theology to Christian laypeople and is presently the Editorial Assistant of Mission Studies.




George Otieno

George Otieno completed his degree and Masters in Philosophy at St John’s university of Tanzania and is currently a PhD research student at Leeds Trinity University, where he is working with the Theology and Religious Studies department on a research project entitled ‘Religion, Mission and Ecology: A Quest for the intersection of theology, bioethics, and local wisdom for the Ecological conservation among the Luo people in Tanzania’

George's previously completed academic research projects are: Biblical Environmentalism (2011), Christianity and the promotion of Environmental wellbeing within the mining community (2013).
George’s interests are Anthropology, environmental missiology, ecotheology, ethics, environmental sociology, ecology and anthropological study of ecology, ecological justice, ecological sustainability, local wisdom, climatology and interdisciplinary study of ecology.

 



Naziya O’Reilly

Education:

- BA in English at York (2000-2003);
-
PGCE in Primary Education at York St John (2005-2006);
- MA in Education at Leeds Trinity University (2009-2014).

Current role: Ph.D. in Philosophy of Education ‘Behaviour Policy and Practice: From Assertive Discipline to Ethical Relationships’ at Leeds Trinity University


Summary of Research:


Restorative practice is a behaviour management model that emphasises relationship based approaches over punitive, rule based systems.By drawing upon a historical overview on differing approaches to behaviour management and current empirical research on restorative practice in schools, I propose that restorative practice might be richly re-conceptualised by drawing attention to some of the ideas from continental philosophy. By applying the ideas of Stanley Cavell and his work on genres of film he categorises as ‘melodramas of the unknown woman’, I focus on what is at stake in restorative practice in terms of notions of loss and restoration (or recovery) of voice. I maintain that Cavell’s ‘passionate utterance’ foregrounds a ‘turning towards another’ that is embodied in the work of Martin Buber and Emmanual Levinas, who both theorise how interaction through dialogue promotes the development of the self and our ‘becoming persons’. I make the case that while restorative justice, with its inherent philosophical foundation of a relationship based dialogic framework, holds the potential for significant changes to the behaviour paradigm; it must be seen as more than another set of routines for schools. If in education we have true transformation, as we recover our voice, then we have an opportunity to see restorative practice as true ethical encounter that is rooted in creation rather than restoration.

My supervisors are Dr Amanda Fulford (Leeds Trinity University) and Professor Mark Pike (Leeds University).

Previous employment:

  • Primary school teacher for Key Stage 2 (2006-2013);
  • Data manager and Assertive Mentoring Coordinator (2013-2014);
  • Empirical researcher for Education Leeds in the capacity of ‘Leading Teacher’ onLearning Conversations in the Primary School (2009-2012).
  • Chef and restaurant manager (2003-2006)
​Additional:
  • Member of the philosophy of education society of Great Britain (PESGB);
  • Leading seminars on ‘Behaviour policy and practice’ focussing on restorative practice for secondary education students;
  • I have an abstract accepted for the PESGB 50th anniversary conference in Oxford, 2015 and invitations to present working papers at the Institute of Education (UCL) and KU Leuven doctoral colloquium in May, 2015 and for ‘Philosophy as lived experience’ at Tilos, 2015.​


Lauren Padgett 

Twitter: @LaurenPadgett24  

Lauren graduated from Leeds Trinity University in 2011 with a First Class BA Honours degree in History and English. 
Through distance learning with the University of Leicester, she gained a Masters in Museum Studies degree (with Distinction) in 2013. Her dissertation explored intellectual accessibility in museums for visitors with visual impairment, with case studies of good practice (particularly the use of emerging technologies). 

Lauren worked part-time for a local authority’s museums service from 2010 until 2014 in several roles (project officer, casual museum assistant, visitor assistant) and assisted a variety of departments (curatorial, exhibitions, visitor services, education) across multiple sites.
 
She co-curated a popular exhibition as part of her professional development, and assisted with gallery refurbishment projects. 

Lauren became a part-time collections and education intern at a independent charity museum in June 2013 which led to her appointment as a funding strategist and then full-time museum assistant (with collections and managerial responsibilities) until September 2014. 

In January 2015, Lauren joined a team of bloggers for the Journal of Victorian Culture Online. She is a member of the Museums Association; the Yorkshire & Humberside Federation of Museums and Art Galleries; Women’s History Network; Social History Curators Group; and British Association for Victorian Studies. 

PhD Research: 


Working Title: ‘Honest and Fair’ or ‘Passive and Shallow’: Representations of Victorian Women in Museum and Heritage Sites in the Yorkshire and Humber Region. 
PhD Supervisors: Dr Rosemary Mitchell and Dr Nathan Uglow (Leeds Trinity University
PhD Mentor: Dr Mark Westgarth (University of Leeds) 

Lauren started her fulltime PhD studentship at Leeds Trinity University in October 2014. She is attached to Leeds Centre for Victorian Studies.  Her research will explore representations of Victorian women in museum and heritage sites in the Yorkshire and Humber region. Her thesis traces applications of feminist and gender analysis to museums, which explore gender bias, androcentrism and representations of women (in general). The primary research will, using an original model/criterion to measure the representations and analyse how the case study museums represent Victorian women. 

It is hoped that the primary research will analyse and interpret how contemporary museums represent Victorian women; show examples of good and bad practice; recommend ways in which museums can represent Victorian women in a more ‘honest and fair’ way in the future; and provide a tool for exhibition planning and evaluation to help museum professions redress gender bias and promote sex equity. 

Wider Research Interests: 


Lauren’s wider research interests include physical, intellectual and cultural access in museums for traditionally marginalised and ignored groups and individuals, such as women, the LGBT community, indigenous populations, ethnic minority groups and those with disabilities.


Luke Pickard

Luke Pickard is currently undertaking a PhD at Leeds Trinity University entitled: How does an outdoor residential influence adherence for first year university students? The project looks to understand the complex dynamics of how the transition to university can be aided by the university in order to increase retention rates. The project will explore a range of issues such as how does physical activity or green space activities help with relationship formation in first year students. The project will look to establish best practice for outdoor residential service delivery including the specifics of programme content, location, duration and academic-social balance. Furthermore how these features operate to influence retention, attainment and overall student satisfaction.

Prior to him joining Leeds Trinity, Luke completed his Masters by Research degree at the University of Huddersfield for which he received a distinction. This work focussed on sport, exercise, mental health and wellbeing. The research findings from his MRes will be used to improve sport and exercise provision delivered by Leeds and York Partnership Foundation Trust for people with mental health issues in the Leeds area.  Luke also graduated with first class honours in BSc Psychology at the University of Huddersfield. 

Luke is comfortable with a range of research methods but favours the theoretical underpinnings and expressive nature of phenomenological enquiry.

Luke has presented his research findings previously at the International Sports and Society Conference 2014, held in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. 



Josh Poklad

Josh Poklad completed his Bachelor’s degree in English and History and completed a Master’s degree in Victorian Studies, both at Leeds Trinity University. His previous research areas have been The development of the Victorian consumer Christmas, Victorian representations of Father Christmas and The Great Exhibition of 1851 as consumer spectacle.

Josh is currently a PhD student working at Leeds Trinity University, where he is working on a research project entitled “Through the Looking Glass: Spectacle and Social Relations 1851-1914”. His interests are The Victorian Christmas, Victorian consumer culture and consumer society and in relation to that he will be presenting his paper ‘Fairies and Fetish: the Fantastic Economy of Father Christmas’ at Horsforth Library on March 9th, 2015.

 
 
 

Anne Reus

Anne Reus completed a combined BA in English Literature and Japanese Language at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in 2012, her MA in Nineteenth Century Literature and Culture at University of York (2013) and an additional combined MA in Comparative Literature and English Literature at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (2014). 

Anne’s research interests include women writers, their position in the literary establishment and mid-Victorian Literature. Her first dissertation investigated how female popular writers of the 1860s used the figure of the painter to question and criticize their own relationship with the literary marketplace; the second examined the emergence of the painter as an advocate for popular art in mid-century fiction. 

For her thesis, Anne will investigate Virginia Woolf’s representations of Victorians. She is interested in Woolf and female literary traditions, particularly in her uneasy relationship with her less ‘ideal’ predecessors, Victorian women in the arts who do not neatly fit into the established canon of great literature.

 

Georgia Thrasyvoulou

Georgia Thrasyvoulou is a provisional PhD student in the Business Management and Marketing Department. She holds an undergraduate degree in Psychology (BSc) from the University of Cyprus and post-graduate degree in Organizational Psychology (MSc) from the University of Leeds. She is currently working on her PhD project in the field of Organizational Psychology, on a project entitled: "Job Crafting and flexibilisation of working: An empirical investigation of the experience of work intensification in SMEs."

The Project aims to examine the relatively new psychological perspective of Job crafting, along with the flexible working practices acting as responses to work intensification in the contemporary workplace. Job crafting describes the ways employees utilize to redesign their jobs by changing tasks, relations and their perceptions of their working environment. A research model will be created in order to investigate the relationships between job crafting, flexibilization and work intensification in terms of balancing work and life of employees.

Apart from the knowledge offered by her undergraduate and postgraduate studies, during the previous years, Georgia has had the opportunity to practice research, social and organizational skills, diagnostic and analytical skills and her inductive and critical thinking. She is equipped with broad knowledge in advanced research approaches, analyses of both quantitative and qualitative data using IBM SPSS and NVivo software and she expanded her justification and evaluation skills upon different methodologies of data gathering. She appreciates teamwork and cooperation and found out that she can be a charismatic leader and project manager. She has the appropriate organizational skills and commitment to meet deadlines, to work under lots of pressure and workload, and become flexible and quicker at learning and adopting knowledge and skills easily and accurately to achieve her goals. Her previous studies in the UK helped her to further extend her English reading and writing skills but also to realise that studying abroad is an everyday challenge which makes her stronger, more experienced and mature, pushing her out of her comfort zone. Finally her part-time work experiences helped her to develop excellent communication skills, integrity and autonomy.

Her future plans are firstly to continue improving herself both personally and academically. She would like to invest all her knowledge and skills to enrich academia and research field. The combination of research and teaching at the field of Organizational Psychology seems to her as the ideal future job without excluding the possibility of working as a practitioner Organizational Psychology in a company.Georgia Thrasyvoulou

Georgia Thrasyvoulou is a provisional PhD student in the Business Management and Marketing Department. She holds an undergraduate degree in Psychology (BSc) from the University of Cyprus and post-graduate degree in Organizational Psychology (MSc) from the University of Leeds. She is currently working on her PhD project in the field of Organizational Psychology, on a project entitled: "Job Crafting and flexibilisation of working: An empirical investigation of the experience of work intensification in SMEs."

The Project aims to examine the relatively new psychological perspective of Job crafting, along with the flexible working practices acting as responses to work intensification in the contemporary workplace. Job crafting describes the ways employees utilize to redesign their jobs by changing tasks, relations and their perceptions of their working environment. A research model will be created in order to investigate the relationships between job crafting, flexibilization and work intensification in terms of balancing work and life of employees.

Apart from the knowledge offered by her undergraduate and postgraduate studies, during the previous years, Georgia has had the opportunity to practice research, social and organizational skills, diagnostic and analytical skills and her inductive and critical thinking. She is equipped with broad knowledge in advanced research approaches, analyses of both quantitative and qualitative data using IBM SPSS and NVivo software and she expanded her justification and evaluation skills upon different methodologies of data gathering. She appreciates teamwork and cooperation and found out that she can be a charismatic leader and project manager. She has the appropriate organizational skills and commitment to meet deadlines, to work under lots of pressure and workload, and become flexible and quicker at learning and adopting knowledge and skills easily and accurately to achieve her goals. Her previous studies in the UK helped her to further extend her English reading and writing skills but also to realise that studying abroad is an everyday challenge which makes her stronger, more experienced and mature, pushing her out of her comfort zone. Finally her part-time work experiences helped her to develop excellent communication skills, integrity and autonomy.

Her future plans are firstly to continue improving herself both personally and academically. She would like to invest all her knowledge and skills to enrich academia and research field. The combination of research and teaching at the field of Organizational Psychology seems to her as the ideal future job without excluding the possibility of working as a practitioner Organizational Psychology in a company.

 

Rebecca Whittington

Rebecca received a 2:1 MA from the University of Aberdeen in English and the History of Art in 2003. After graduating, she worked as a reporter, news editor, editor and video journalist for some of Yorkshire’s top newspaper and digital titles, including the Yorkshire Post and Yorkshire Evening Post. During that time, Rebecca also gained her NCTJ and NCE qualifications and, later in her career, helped NCE candidates with their training.

Rebecca is now employed as a graduate teaching assistant at Leeds Trinity University in the journalism department and is working towards a PhD measuring the impact and efficacy of digital reporting tools in regional UK newsrooms.

Rebecca’s research includes looking at the priority of language in recruitment advertisements placed by regional newspapers and examining the power of digital innovators and the news consuming audience. To contact Rebecca about her research please email r.whittington@leedstrinity.ac.uk.

A part of Rebecca’s work is to regularly write about events affecting regional news and its provision on her blog, which can be seen at www.rebeccawhittingtonmedia.co.uk  and she has been quoted as an industry commentator, an example of which can be seen here: http://www.holdthefrontpage.co.uk/2015/news/bbc-accused-of-sticking-knife-in-back-of-industry/

 

Kelly Zarins

MA World Cinemas at University of Leeds, 2013

BA(hons) Photographic Art at University of Wales, Newport, 2007
Biography

Kelly Zarins is a provisional PhD candidate in Marginalised Communities and the Interactive Documentary Practice at Leeds Trinity University, Department of Media, Film and Culture. The working title for her thesis is: Working towards collective filmmaking practices: Turning collaborative antecedents into collectivist methodologies in the interactive documentary.

Kelly’s previous areas of research have included: the depiction of workers and migrants in early European and East Asian cinemas, and comparative studies into the temporal states of still and moving images. Her current practice based research is on the impact and experiences of collaboration and collectivism in the interactive documentary.

Experience and Skills:


  • Video:
  • DV and HD video production
  • Final Cut Pro editing software
  • Abode Premiere editing software
  • Exhibition installation and co-ordination
  • Photography:
  • Canon D-SLRs
  • Photoshop
  • Analogue SLRs (Canon and Pentax)
  • Darkroom and film-lab processes (alternative and traditional processes; C41 and monochrome
  • processing and printing)
  • Exhibition installation and co-ordination

Conference papers:


Outsiders: An Exploration of Class Narratives in Room at the Top presented at the Language/
Cinema conference held at Leeds Humanities Research Institute, University of Leeds on the 8th
December 2013

Exhibitions:


  • Screen Seven (10 minute Photo Roman, short film, mixed media: monochrome and DV archive footage) shown as part of the Exit Velocity group degree show, University of Wales, Newport
  • Graduate Art show May 2007 and later show at the Free Range Graduate Art Show, London,14th June- 20th June 2007
  • Co-ordinator of video art installation for the Exit Velocity group degree show at University of Wales
  • Newport Graduate Art show May 2007, and Free Range Graduate Art Show 14th June- 20th June 2007
  • Built to Last (2x C41 prints 8x10” mounted on sheet steel) Selected for a group exhibition.
 
 
 

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